RECENT PRESS

THE BOARDWALK AT GRANITE PARK  Dallas AIA 2019 Design Award Jurors’ Choice

THE BOARDWALK AT GRANITE PARK

Dallas AIA 2019 Design Award Jurors’ Choice

RECENT PRESS

We are proud to announce  Cliff Welch, AIA  was listed in D Home among The  2019 BEST ARCHITECTS IN DALLAS

We are proud to announce Cliff Welch, AIA was listed in D Home among The 2019 BEST ARCHITECTS IN DALLAS

 
DHomeProfile_Welch_web.jpg
 

What do you love about residential architecture in Dallas?

”Dallas residential architecture represents a wide diversity of architects and styles that collectively create a rich and meaningful architectural fabric and heritage.”


”Our neighborhoods include carefully crafted and well-executed examples of every imaginable historical style. Highland Park and Lakewood neighborhoods contain beautiful examples of Spanish Colonial Revival, Mediterranean and Romaneseque, imported from early Beverly Hills and Southern California by Architects such as Clifford Hutsell and Charles Dilbeck. Craftsman and Prairie Style homes at every scale are scattered throughout the city. Our collection of Texas regional modernism is unprecedented, with residences rooted in our own distinct climate, context and culture by Architects such as David Williams, O’Neil Ford, Bud Ogelsby and Frank Welch. This local regionalism seamlessly blends with the early to mid-century modernism coming out of the East and West Coasts in the work of Howard Meyer, Arch Swank, Scott Lyons and E.G. Hamilton just to name a few. Internationally renown architects such as Antoine Predock, Robert Stern, Richard Meyer, Edward Durrell Stone and Stephen Holl have all contributed to the residential collection.”

“Exciting and innovative projects are continuing to emerge through the work of my colleagues and contemporaries as we break new ground and set new precedent for the residential architecture that will influence the next generation. With its rich architectural heritage Dallas continues to be an exciting and inspirational place to practice architecture.”


Cliff Welch, AIA

Ridge_House_DHome.jpg

VACATION HOMES

LAKE HOUSES & MOUNTAIN HOMES

Second homes, whether they be located on a nearby Texas Lake, in the mountains, or nestled into a canyon outside of Napa Valley, have become an increasing growing part of our practice.

Nearly 3 decades ago, Cliff had the opportunity of working on a family retreat on a private lake in East Texas for Henry C. Beck, Jr, while working as an Architect with the late Bud Ogelsby. After starting Welch Architecture in 2000, we have had several opportunities to continue work on weekend and vacation homes, as well as some primary residences in beautiful locations, such as overlooking Tiburan Bay just outside of San Francisco, to overlooking the Tetons in Wyoming.

EAST TEXAS LAKE HOUSE

An East Texas weekend get away designed for the late Henry C. Beck, Jr. in 1991. The residence was broken down into 4 separate structures, the main living and gathering space, a master suite, and two guest cabins, all connected by exterior decks and wallkways, tucked under a canopy of East Texas Pines. Exterior materials include locally harvested pine columns, bleached redwood siding, local stone, and paint grip metal roofing.

Dallas American Institute of Architects Honor Award 1991

Ogelsby Group Architects, Cliff Welch AIA, Project Architect

WINTER RETREAT  Full Project here

WINTER RETREAT Full Project here

Fox-HollowFRontA(web).jpg
FOX HOLLOW LAKEHOUSE Lake Lewisville

FOX HOLLOW LAKEHOUSE Lake Lewisville

FOX HOLLOW LAKEHOUSE Lake Lewisville

FOX HOLLOW LAKEHOUSE Lake Lewisville

TAWAKONI LAKEHOUSE Site Sketch

TAWAKONI LAKEHOUSE Site Sketch

TAWAKONI LAKEHOUSE View from Lake

TAWAKONI LAKEHOUSE View from Lake

SONOMA VALLEY RESIDENCE AND VINYARD Full project  here

SONOMA VALLEY RESIDENCE AND VINYARD Full project here

LAKE WINNSBORO RETREAT  Full project here

LAKE WINNSBORO RETREAT Full project here

INSPIRATION

ALVAR AALTO

1898-1976

Alvar_Aalto_treated.jpg

Recognized today as one of the great masters of modern architecture, Alvar Aalto (1898-1976) was born in Kuortane, Finland. During a long and prolific career, Aalto designed buildings for almost all key public institutions, as well as standardized housing and private homes, leaving a legacy of lasting resonance.

Aalto’s architecture is distinctively Finnish, strongly individual, and marked by a warm humanity. His buildings derive their aesthetic character from their dynamic relationship with their natural surroundings, their human scale, superbly executed details, unique treatment of materials, and ingenious use of lighting.

Aalto began designing furnishings as a natural extension of his architectural thinking. His first modern piece of furniture was created in 1931-32 for the tuberculosis sanatorium in Paimio, Finland. Through his innovations in form and line, Alvar Aalto’s name has also become important in the history of design. His contribution to furniture design was among his foremost achievements .

Savoy Vase (1963-1937)

Savoy Vase (1963-1937)

Villa Mairea in Noormarkku, Finland, Opened in 1939

Villa Mairea in Noormarkku, Finland, Opened in 1939

Villa Mairea, Interior

Villa Mairea, Interior

Finlandia Hall, Helsinki (1971)  Photo by: Rune Snellman

Finlandia Hall, Helsinki (1971)

Photo by: Rune Snellman

In front the studio wing, The Aalto House (1936)  Photo by: Maija Holma

In front the studio wing, The Aalto House (1936)

Photo by: Maija Holma

Main entrance, The Aalto House (1936)  Photo by: Maija Holma

Main entrance, The Aalto House (1936)

Photo by: Maija Holma

From living room to the studio, The Aalto House (1936)  Photo by: Maija Holma

From living room to the studio, The Aalto House (1936)

Photo by: Maija Holma

Stacking Stools-model 60 (1932-1933)

Stacking Stools-model 60 (1932-1933)

Maison Louis Carré (1956-59, 1961-63)  Photo by: Addison Goedel

Maison Louis Carré (1956-59, 1961-63)

Photo by: Addison Goedel

Cross of the Plains Church (1957) and Parish Centre (1965)  Photo by: Maija Holma

Cross of the Plains Church (1957) and Parish Centre (1965)

Photo by: Maija Holma

Cultural Center Wolfsburg (1958-62)

Cultural Center Wolfsburg (1958-62)

Paimio Chair (1931-32)

Paimio Chair (1931-32)

Alvar Aalto Studio, Helsinki, Finland (1955)  Photo by: Pieter Lozie Photography

Alvar Aalto Studio, Helsinki, Finland (1955)

Photo by: Pieter Lozie Photography

Church of the Three Crosses, Vuoksenniska, Imatra, Finland, Section model. (1955-58)

Church of the Three Crosses, Vuoksenniska, Imatra, Finland, Section model. (1955-58)

Tea Trolley (1936)

Tea Trolley (1936)

Source: https://www.alvaraalto.fi/en/works/archite...

INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE

LOFTS AND HIGH RISE LIVING

Design opportunities don’t necessarily begin with an empty lot, with the growth of our city and surrounding areas, urban living is an increasing market among all ages and demographics. We have been fortunate to work with great clients on a diverse mix of interior residences, ranging from lofts in Deep Ellum and Uptown to high rise units both Downtown and along Turtle Creek, each providing their own design challenges and unique opportunities.

MAGNOLIA LOFT MASTER BATH | SHOWER

MAGNOLIA LOFT MASTER BATH | SHOWER

ARTS DISTRICT RESIDENCE

Working in close collaboration with Lynch Eisinger Design Architects, New York, WELCH | HALL served as the local architect for this 3,200 sf high-rise apartment for art collectors, located in the heart of the Arts and Museum District. Cypress, walnut, glass and blued steel provide a rich backdrop for the owner’s private art collection ( not shown) and breathtaking views of the Dallas Skyline. The interior space is framed by planes and volumes of varied texture and material, creating a rich but subtle background for the works displayed and the domestic program.

ARTS DISTRICT APARTMENT See full project  here

ARTS DISTRICT APARTMENT See full project here

GOLDCREST | HIGH RISE RESIDENCE ON TURTLE CREEK

Originally designed by noted Dallas Architect George Dahl, The Gold Crest is one of the most architecturally significant buildings on Turtle Creek Boulevard. Our recently completed fourth floor residence takes its design inspiration from the historic 1965 iconic high rise it is housed within.

THE GOLDCREST, See full project  here.

THE GOLDCREST, See full project here.

MUSEUM TOWER APARTMENT Downtown view to West, Scheduled Completion Oct 2019

MUSEUM TOWER APARTMENT Downtown view to West, Scheduled Completion Oct 2019

MUSEUM TOWER APARTMENT Main living area looking West

MUSEUM TOWER APARTMENT Main living area looking West

MUSEUM TOWER APARTMENT Main living area

MUSEUM TOWER APARTMENT Main living area

Recent Press: Dallas Advocate Spring 2019

WHAT MAKES A HOME MEANINGFUL?

Interview with Architect Cliff Welch   In a time of teardowns, gentrification and home tours, neighbors debate what makes a house a home. Is it the square footage, location, elaborate finishes or state-of-the-art technology? Less tangible elements give a home its heart and soul, says Clifford Welch, architect at  Welch/Hall . Architecture can be a thoughtful balance of restraint, he says. Welch and his wife, Donna, bought  1019 Waterford Drive  in 1996. Designed by Glenn Allen Galaway for John Houseman and Esther Webb in 1953, the house has been honored by Dallas American Institute of Architects and Preservation Dallas. Here’s how the Welch family turned a mid-century modern into a home well-lived after buying it from the Houseman daughter.

Interview with Architect Cliff Welch

In a time of teardowns, gentrification and home tours, neighbors debate what makes a house a home. Is it the square footage, location, elaborate finishes or state-of-the-art technology? Less tangible elements give a home its heart and soul, says Clifford Welch, architect at Welch/Hall. Architecture can be a thoughtful balance of restraint, he says. Welch and his wife, Donna, bought 1019 Waterford Drive in 1996. Designed by Glenn Allen Galaway for John Houseman and Esther Webb in 1953, the house has been honored by Dallas American Institute of Architects and Preservation Dallas. Here’s how the Welch family turned a mid-century modern into a home well-lived after buying it from the Houseman daughter.

What was your redesign strategy?   It had lived through several decades of style and trends. We spent several years restoring it back to its original roots. All the bones were there. We just needed to pull out the green shag carpet and period wallpaper and bring the original colors, materials and finishes back to life. We haven’t moved any major walls.

What was your redesign strategy?

It had lived through several decades of style and trends. We spent several years restoring it back to its original roots. All the bones were there. We just needed to pull out the green shag carpet and period wallpaper and bring the original colors, materials and finishes back to life. We haven’t moved any major walls.

IMG_9217_1200X863_150DPI_WEB.jpg
Why did you buy the house?   In 1995, when Donna and I were looking for our first home, we had narrowed down our search to East Dallas. We wanted to be close to downtown and White Rock Lake. We had always appreciated the character of older neighborhoods, especially those that had some mid-century modern homes. After spending many evenings and weekends driving around Lakewood, Forest Hills, the M Streets, Casa Linda, Hollywood Heights and Lake Highlands, we discovered Lake Park Estates by accident. We were drawn by the mature trees and creek visible from Buckner and Lake Highlands Drive. We were fortunate to come across one of the few classic mid-century modern homes just as it was about to be put on the market.

Why did you buy the house?

In 1995, when Donna and I were looking for our first home, we had narrowed down our search to East Dallas. We wanted to be close to downtown and White Rock Lake. We had always appreciated the character of older neighborhoods, especially those that had some mid-century modern homes. After spending many evenings and weekends driving around Lakewood, Forest Hills, the M Streets, Casa Linda, Hollywood Heights and Lake Highlands, we discovered Lake Park Estates by accident. We were drawn by the mature trees and creek visible from Buckner and Lake Highlands Drive. We were fortunate to come across one of the few classic mid-century modern homes just as it was about to be put on the market.

ADVOCATE3.jpg
What made it a home for your family?   This is the only home our son, Dylan, has ever known. We’ve watched his room go from an office/guest room to a nursery, to a kid’s room, and is now full of college students playing video games whenever he and his friends are back during breaks. It’s been the venue for numerous parties, showers, fundraisers and countless fire-pit nights. It’s no different from any other family home, other than perhaps the openness and seamless connection from the inside to the outside. The home’s backyard backs up to Dixon Branch and Old Lake Highlands Park.

What made it a home for your family?

This is the only home our son, Dylan, has ever known. We’ve watched his room go from an office/guest room to a nursery, to a kid’s room, and is now full of college students playing video games whenever he and his friends are back during breaks. It’s been the venue for numerous parties, showers, fundraisers and countless fire-pit nights. It’s no different from any other family home, other than perhaps the openness and seamless connection from the inside to the outside. The home’s backyard backs up to Dixon Branch and Old Lake Highlands Park.

What’s it like when your son leaves?   It’s taken us a while to get used to the house being quiet while Dylan is at school. Now we’ve come to appreciate the weekends full of activity, balanced with the quiet respite of being empty nesters.

What’s it like when your son leaves?

It’s taken us a while to get used to the house being quiet while Dylan is at school. Now we’ve come to appreciate the weekends full of activity, balanced with the quiet respite of being empty nesters.

IMG_1292_1200X900_150DPI_WEB.jpg
IMG_9101_1200X900_150DPI_WEB.jpg
IMG_1231_1200X900(150DPI)WEB.jpg
IMG_1314._1800x1200-(150dpi)WEB.jpg
IMG_E7514_900X900_150DPI_WEB.jpg
What makes a Home Meaningful?   What is it that makes a home meaningful? Is it the square footage, location, elaborate finishes, or state-of-the-art technology? While each of these may contribute, there are other less tangible elements that give a home its heart and soul.  Like a well written piece of music, a home is the sum of its carefully crafted “notes.” Each note, each stanza: rhythm, tone, harmony, melody, texture and form unite to create the collective ensemble.  Both music and architecture can be a thoughtful balance of restraint, accentuated with moments of vibrancy and crescendo. Fewer notes, fewer materials can result in a stronger, more cohesive whole, pleasing to the ear and to the eye. The materials play together in harmony; the texture of carefully crafted brick or stone, balanced against the soft warmth of wood. Simple walls of subtle tones balanced with those of bold color complimenting the natural materials around them, each serving as a backdrop for art and photography. Concrete, wood, steel and glass; simple and elemental building materials, each providing their own beauty.  Attention to detail is integral to lasting and meaningful work, regardless of scale. Whether taking the time and patience to orchestrate the juxtaposition of materials and finishes or to simply provide enough storage and display space for reducing clutter, thus paring down the notes and eliminating those deemed unnecessary or out of tune. Rethinking what is considered typical or acceptable is one aspect of the process, for example designing the way one enters their home on a daily basis by creating an integrated space for the car. The sequence of pulling into a beautiful open carport, connected to both nature and the materials and detailing of the home, provides a different daily experience than parking amongst the lawn equipment, ice chests and camping equipment.  Light brings architecture to life: it is essential to the mood, it defines form, shape and space. Its quality and color set the tone for the materials on which it falls. It’s movement throughout the day creates a rhythm, its distinct stanzas repeated day after day, season after season. Floor to ceiling glass blurs the distinction between interior and exterior space, carefully placed windows can frame views, clerestory windows just below the roofline provide ambient light while capture the color, movement and shadows, of sunrises, sunsets, clouds and moonlight filtered through the trees. Frosted glass and sunscreens provide natural light while adding privacy, and pattern.  A home connects to nature and its surroundings in many ways. Screen porches and operable windows allow for breezes, fresh air, and the sounds of nature to resonate within the home. It may be the soft refrain of the wind blowing through the bamboo, or the ballad of a mockingbird. The music of soft rain on the roof and through trees or thunderstorms rolling in connect us to the natural world around us.  Incorporating the basic elements of fire and water into the home and connect us back to the basic human emotion. A small fountain or reflecting pool can provide movement that can extends across walls, ceilings and into the trees. Fireplaces and firepits connect us back to the essential elements of the earth.  Well-designed homes enhance the lives of their inhabitants, and reflect their lifestyle, personality, and individuality. Our own home designed in 1953 embraces many, if not all of the elements above and has played meaningful part in our lives.    Cliff Welch, AIA   1019 Waterford Drive was designed by Glenn Allen Galaway for John Houseman and Esther Webb in 1953. This home has been honored with tby Dallas American Institute of Architects with its 25 Year Award for lasting meaningful architecture, by Preservation Dallas, and has been on numerous architectural and home tours.

What makes a Home Meaningful?

What is it that makes a home meaningful? Is it the square footage, location, elaborate finishes, or state-of-the-art technology? While each of these may contribute, there are other less tangible elements that give a home its heart and soul.

Like a well written piece of music, a home is the sum of its carefully crafted “notes.” Each note, each stanza: rhythm, tone, harmony, melody, texture and form unite to create the collective ensemble.

Both music and architecture can be a thoughtful balance of restraint, accentuated with moments of vibrancy and crescendo. Fewer notes, fewer materials can result in a stronger, more cohesive whole, pleasing to the ear and to the eye. The materials play together in harmony; the texture of carefully crafted brick or stone, balanced against the soft warmth of wood. Simple walls of subtle tones balanced with those of bold color complimenting the natural materials around them, each serving as a backdrop for art and photography. Concrete, wood, steel and glass; simple and elemental building materials, each providing their own beauty.

Attention to detail is integral to lasting and meaningful work, regardless of scale. Whether taking the time and patience to orchestrate the juxtaposition of materials and finishes or to simply provide enough storage and display space for reducing clutter, thus paring down the notes and eliminating those deemed unnecessary or out of tune. Rethinking what is considered typical or acceptable is one aspect of the process, for example designing the way one enters their home on a daily basis by creating an integrated space for the car. The sequence of pulling into a beautiful open carport, connected to both nature and the materials and detailing of the home, provides a different daily experience than parking amongst the lawn equipment, ice chests and camping equipment.

Light brings architecture to life: it is essential to the mood, it defines form, shape and space. Its quality and color set the tone for the materials on which it falls. It’s movement throughout the day creates a rhythm, its distinct stanzas repeated day after day, season after season. Floor to ceiling glass blurs the distinction between interior and exterior space, carefully placed windows can frame views, clerestory windows just below the roofline provide ambient light while capture the color, movement and shadows, of sunrises, sunsets, clouds and moonlight filtered through the trees. Frosted glass and sunscreens provide natural light while adding privacy, and pattern.

A home connects to nature and its surroundings in many ways. Screen porches and operable windows allow for breezes, fresh air, and the sounds of nature to resonate within the home. It may be the soft refrain of the wind blowing through the bamboo, or the ballad of a mockingbird. The music of soft rain on the roof and through trees or thunderstorms rolling in connect us to the natural world around us.

Incorporating the basic elements of fire and water into the home and connect us back to the basic human emotion. A small fountain or reflecting pool can provide movement that can extends across walls, ceilings and into the trees. Fireplaces and firepits connect us back to the essential elements of the earth.

Well-designed homes enhance the lives of their inhabitants, and reflect their lifestyle, personality, and individuality. Our own home designed in 1953 embraces many, if not all of the elements above and has played meaningful part in our lives.

Cliff Welch, AIA

1019 Waterford Drive was designed by Glenn Allen Galaway for John Houseman and Esther Webb in 1953. This home has been honored with tby Dallas American Institute of Architects with its 25 Year Award for lasting meaningful architecture, by Preservation Dallas, and has been on numerous architectural and home tours.

Inspiration: Dieter Rams

Dieter Rams has inspired not just us, but an entire generation of designers. He was one of the spearheads for modernist design, joining Braun in 1955 as an architect and interior designer and later becoming the chief design officer. Under his leadership, Braun produced several iconic designs, including the ET66 calculator, SK4 turntable, T41 radio and ABK31 clock.

During his career, Rams began to question his design. Could he consider his work “good?” To answer, he developed ten principles for good design.

The impact of Ram’s influence is still felt long after the height of the modernist movement. Jonathan Ive, who was a member of Apple’s design team for 27 years, was heavily influenced by Rams’ work and philosophy and several Apple products are reminiscent of older Braun designs.

Braun Nizo 156 Macro “Super 8” camera.

Braun Nizo 156 Macro “Super 8” camera.

Dieter Rams, early in his career.

Dieter Rams, early in his career.

SK4 turntable.

SK4 turntable.

Our very own Dean Bowman has a very impressive and rare collection of both the Atelier 1-7 and SK61 phonographs.

Our very own Dean Bowman has a very impressive and rare collection of both the Atelier 1-7 and SK61 phonographs.

Braun T3 transmitter radio and the first-generation Apple iPod.

Braun T3 transmitter radio and the first-generation Apple iPod.

SM 2 razor.

SM 2 razor.

FS-80 television.

FS-80 television.

Coffee maker.

Coffee maker.

Dieter Rams and his silver Porsche 993, arguably the greatest sportscar ever.

Dieter Rams and his silver Porsche 993, arguably the greatest sportscar ever.

Cool Cars: 1939 Porsche Type 64

This 1939 Porsche Type 64 will be sold at RM Sotheby’s Monterey Car Week auction. It’s considered the foundation for Porsche’s subsequent success and predates both the 364 roadster and 911.

Porsche produced only three of the Type 64. One model was destroyed during early World War II, and the other was stolen and destroyed by Americans near the end of the war. The last model, used by the Porsche family, was sold to Otto Mathé, who owned it until his death in 1995. Thomas Gruber, a Porsche collector, took ownership of it. It has been restored over the course of its lifespan to retain its original condition.

To read more about the auction and the history of the last remaining model, click here.

Also check out this video featuring Porsche aficionado and racing legend Jeff Zwart talking about the car.

The Type 64 that will be sold.

The Type 64 that will be sold.

1939-Porsche-Type-64_0.jpg
The Type 64 when it was owned by Otto Mathé.

The Type 64 when it was owned by Otto Mathé.

In addition, check out these other cool Porsches, both of which were not possible without the Type 64.

Porsche 356 roadster.

Porsche 356 roadster.

The first-generation Porsche 911.

The first-generation Porsche 911.

Local Music: Ruthie Foster

Perhaps no one best embodies the blues genre quite like Ruthie Foster. Born in rural Gause, TX, she began her musical career in an unexpected way--by enlisting in the Navy and joining the branch's Pride group. Her incredible skill was recognized by several record companies, including Atlantic Records in New York. However, seeing that she'd have to sacrifice her authenticity for her record deal, Foster walked away and returned back to Texas. Since then, she has released five albums, been nominated for three Grammy Awards for Best Blues Album, and is gearing up to release her sixth album, Joy Comes Back.

music_feature1.jpg

WHITE ROCK HOME TOUR 2019

We are pleased to report that the Lake Highlands in-progress residence was a huge hit on the White Rock Home Tour!

The residence, the third residence for the TEN201 project in Lake Highlands, provided the first-ever opportunity for tour guests to see inside an in-progress project. We had around 1500 people walk through the house over the two days of the tour.

The White Rock Home Tour, which took place on April 27-28, saw over 3000 people come through the homes and raised over $50,000 for the Hexter Elementary School’s PTA.

IMG_1810.jpg
Some facts about the home as one moves through.

Some facts about the home as one moves through.

Cliff was on site during the entire tour and was able to talk with most of those that came through.

Cliff was on site during the entire tour and was able to talk with most of those that came through.

Future living room overlooking the courtyard and pool.

Future living room overlooking the courtyard and pool.

Graceful curves of the pool and roof in the courtyard.

Graceful curves of the pool and roof in the courtyard.

The canted screen wall parallels the entry and provides privacy from the front yard and street.

The canted screen wall parallels the entry and provides privacy from the front yard and street.

A little bold color during consruction.

A little bold color during consruction.

Rosewood Court

The remodel of Rosewood Court is nearly complete!

Rosewood Court, originally designed by leading international architecture firm Skidmore, Owings and Merrill, now includes a new garage entryway and a new Flower Child location, the fourth location in the Dallas/Fort Worth area and the first in Uptown. Flower Child is a cafe with healthy vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free choices that are made with locally-sourced ingredients. The remodeled space features a brand-new 1500 square foot patio for outdoor seating.

We are honored to be the local architect of record for this project.

Read more about Flower Child’s new location here.

New outdoor dining patio.

New outdoor dining patio.

New garage entryway and gallery.

New garage entryway and gallery.

New steel and frosted glass canopy.

New steel and frosted glass canopy.

Canopy detail.

Canopy detail.

Railing detail.

Railing detail.

Look for the Uptown Flower Child grand opening this fall!

Look for the Uptown Flower Child grand opening this fall!

Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum

Slated to open on September 18, the new Dallas Holocaust and Human RIghts Museum reaffirms the museum’s mission to "[teach] the history of the Holocaust and [advance] human rights to combat prejudice, hatred and indifference." The new LEED-certified museum is located in the Historic West End district near Dealey Plaza.

See more images here.

DallasHolocaustMuseum- Studio Awards copy.jpg
_MG_3210.jpg
_MG_3245.jpg
DHHRM 15 SECTION WHITE.jpg
Designed by Scott Hall while at Omniplan.

Designed by Scott Hall while at Omniplan.

Amanda Aman's Traveling Fellowship

Last fall, Amanda applied for the Stewardson Keefe LeBrun Travel Grant, provided by the Center for Architecture and AIA New York. Amanda received $10,000 from the grant to fund her exploration trip beginning in July! She is traveling to Norway, Greenland, and Iceland over the entire month to study climate change in the arctic circle periphery and how architects can design with environmental context to create structures that are conscious of its surrounding ecosystems.

Amanda is a project architect at Welch | Hall Architects and an assistant professor at the University of Texas at Arlington.

Fjords in Norway.

Fjords in Norway.

FABDEE60-388E-4581-A901-668EDB079BAB.jpeg
Greenland’s floating icebergs.

Greenland’s floating icebergs.

DSC_0927.jpg